Epidemiological, social and technical aspects of indoor air pollution from biomass fuel

Report of a WHO Consultation June 1991.
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World Health Organization , Geneva
Other titlesIndoor air pollution from biomass fuel.
SeriesWHO/PEP/92.3A
ContributionsAchmadi, Umar F., World Health Organization.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17424268M

Consultation on Epidemiological Social, and Technical Aspects of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Fuel (‎ Geneva, Switzerland)‎ & World Health Organization. Prevention of Environmental Pollution Unit.

Description Epidemiological, social and technical aspects of indoor air pollution from biomass fuel PDF

(‎)‎. Consultation on Epidemiological Social, and Technical Aspects of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Fuel (‎ Geneva, Switzerland)‎ & World Health Organization. Prevention of Environmental Pollution Unit. (‎)‎. Indoor air pollution from biomass fuel: working papers from a WHO consultation, June World Health Organization.

One-third of the world's population burn organic material such as wood, dung or charcoal (biomass fuel) for cooking, heating and lighting.

This form of energy usage is associated with high levels of indoor air pollution and an increase in the incidence of respiratory infections, including pneumonia, tuberculosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, low birthweight, cataracts Cited by:   The main strength of the present study is the large nationally representative dataset from the National Family Health Survey, which allowed us to examine the effect of indoor air pollution from biomass and solid fuel combustion along with a range of socioeconomic, maternal, and health and lifestyle factors in relation to preeclampsia/eclampsia Cited by: (LMICs), is the indoor air pollution.

Indoor air pollu-tion, from traditional fuels (such as biomass and coal) and cooking stoves, is associated with an increase in the incidence of respiratory infections, including pneu-monia, tuberculosis and chronic obstructive pulmo-nary disease, low birthweight, cataracts, cardiovascularCited by:   Thus, the use of processed fuel should be encouraged.

REFERENCES I. World Health Organization, Report of a WHO Consultation, JuneEpidemiological social and technical aspects of indoor air pollution, WHO/PEP/A (). de Koning, K. Smith and J. Last, Bull. World Health Organizat 11 ().

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For the last several years his primary focus has been the health effects of exposure to indoor air pollution from biomass fuels. With support from the Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan, he has helped to develop a Columbia-wide biomass working group, which coordinates and supports interdisciplinary research on the topic.

primary pathway through which traditional biomass fuel use affects health is through indoor air pollution. Biomass fuels generally contain few contaminants such as sulfur or metals, so their complete combustion, under proper conditions, can result in “clean” products of carbon dioxide and water.

Exposure to particulate and nitrogen dioxide air pollution has been associated with impaired ventilatory function in adults and reduced lung growth in children.

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In developing countries indoor air pollution from biomass fuel (used for cooking and heating) has been implicated as a risk factor for COPD, particularly in women. General aspects of assessment of human health effects of lndoor Air Pollution system. For each of these groups, effects associated with indoor air pollution (IAP), the principle agents and sources, evidence linking IAP to the effect(s), susceptible groups, mental and social well-being, and not.

Epidemiological, Social and Technical Aspects of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass fuel. Geneva: Report of WHO Consultation. Geneva: Report of WHO Consultation. Google Scholar. In developing countries the price of rapid growth is all too often noxious airborne pollution, which annually contributes to a disturbing number of avoidable deaths.

In recent decades, however, there has been considerable progress in the epidemiology of air pollution, significant changes in international air pollution guidelines, and the emergence of more systematic approaches to air pollution.

A recent baseline survey conducted in two districts of Zimbabwe found that women and young children spend an average of 5 hours per day in the kitchen area, where air pollution levels from biomass fuel combustion for cooking tend to be very high. The measured levels of CO in the kitchen were in the range of – p.p.m.

The smoke emissions from these fuels are an important source of indoor air pollution, especially in rural communities in developing countries.

and on the epidemiological aspects is urgently. Indoor air pollution from household biomass fuels is associated with a significant increase in risk for exposed young children compared to children living in households using cleaner fuels. Identification and control of risk factors is needed to reduce the incidence of ARI and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality in children below 5.

Indoor air pollution is one of the world’s largest environmental problems – particularly for the poorest in the world who often do not have access to clean fuels for cooking.

The Global Burden of Disease is a major global study on the causes and risk factors for death and disease published in the medical journal The Lancet. 2 These estimates of the annual number of deaths attributed to a.

In such developing countries, however, huge economic and social disparities coexist; thus, in addition to the poor ambient air quality, people can be also exposed, especially in rural areas, to high concentrations of indoor air pollution due to the use of biomass fuels (coal, wood, and other solid fuels) as an energy resource [17,18].

Indoor air pollution could increase the risk for severe pneumonia by enhancing infection process by pneumonia pathogens.

This may occur if exposure to pollutants contained in the biomass fuel either enhances attack of epithelia cells of respiratory tract and/or reduces specific and non-specific host immunity.

Irrespective of mechanisms. In reality, however, air pollution tends to be higher in developing regions. This is attributable to the combustion of biomass fuel indoors. Indoor air pollution is not only dependent on the combustion of solid fuel, but it is also affected by overcrowded housing conditions and exposure to second-hand smoke inside the house.

organisms in ambient air. Globally, at least 2 billion people are exposed to the toxic smoke of biomass fuel, typically burned ineffi ciently in poorly ventilated indoor stoves or fi replaces. One billion people inhale polluted outdoor air, and 1 billion are exposed to.

Indoor air pollution (IAP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. But its severity is much more in the developing countries due to burning of traditional biomass fuels such as wood, animal dung, and crop residues for daily domestic cooking in rural households.

• Besides these disease adverse pregnancy outcome, low birth weight of babies, eye problems, hypertension etc. are associated with the use of biomass fuel. Indoor air pollution in developed and developing countries with special reference to India • According to EPA, the 4 most dangerous indoor air pollutants in developed countries are.

Patterns and predictors of personal exposure to indoor air pollution from biomass combustion among women and children in rural China. Indoor Air21 (/inaissue-6), DOI: /jx. Indoor air pollution (IAP) caused by solid fuel use and/or traditional cooking stoves is a global health threat, particularly for women and young children.

The WHO World Health Report estimates that IAP is responsible for % of the loss of disability adjusted life years (DALYs) worldwide and % in high mortality developing countries. Each year approximately 3 million people die prematurely from household air pollution due to domestic use of biomass (wood, charcoal), particularly in lower-and-middle-income countries.

Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK Interests: indoor air pollution; tobacco control research; occupational epidemiology; air quality measurement and interventions relating to second-hand smoke, biomass fuel smoke and workplace inhalation hazards.

Biomass and solid fuels are a major source of indoor air pollution, but in developing countries the health effects of indoor air pollution are poorly understood.

In this study we examined the effect of cooking smoke produced by biomass and solid fuel combustion on the reported prevalence of asthma among adult men and women in India.

Sinha D and Ray M () Health Effects of Indoor Air Pollution Due to Cooking with Biomass Fuel Studies on Experimental Toxicology and Pharmacology, /_14, (). Redai I and Haczku A () Air Pollution and Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease Air Pollution and Health Effects, /_5, (   A cross-sectional assessment of indoor air quality in Nepal and its health effects revealed that solid biomass fuels (animal dung, crop residue, and wood) were the main sources of indoor air pollution affecting health.

The average smoke level (PM 10) in kitchens using biomass fuels was about three times higher than that in those using cleaner. Fullerton DG, Bruce N, Gordon SB. Indoor air pollution from biomass fuel smoke is a major health concern in the developing world.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. ; – doi: / [PMC free article] Nogueira JB. Air pollution and cardiovascular disease. Rev Port Cardiol. ; –. Biomass fuels are extensively used for cooking and home heating in developing countries and have health adverse effects ().Recent estimates (2, 3) attribute to 2 million deaths per year worldwide to indoor air pollution, most of them (1 million) occurring in children younger than 5 years due to acute respiratory infections (ARI), but also in women due to chronic obstructive pulmonary.

The review discusses the extent of indoor air pollution related to use of biomass for cooking and assesses its impact on various health and social problems, including lung diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes and human development, especially in vulnerable populations.

It also offers strategies to mitigate problems related to indoor air pollution.Indoor air pollution (IAP) caused by solid fuel use and/or traditional cooking stoves is a global health threat, particularly for women and young children.

The WHO World Health Report estimates that IAP is responsible for % of the loss of disability adjusted life years (DALYs) worldwide and % in high-mortality developing countries.